Atlas Obscura: Inside the Fight to Save an Overlooked Piece of Country Music History

A nondescript building in Atlanta, considered a birthplace of country music, may soon be demolished—and become a Margaritaville.

Supporters of the campaign to save 152 Nassau have been posting little paper hearts on the front of the building.
Supporters of the campaign to save 152 Nassau have been posting little paper hearts on the front of the building.

Tucked away on a side street street in downtown Atlanta, Georgia, it’s easy to overlook the two-story brick building at 152 Nassau Street NW.

A concert hall called the Tabernacle towers over it. So does one of the area’s newest tourist draws, a 20-story Ferris wheel. It hardly draws a second look from people headed for Centennial Olympic Park, CNN Center, or the gleaming new Mercedes-Benz Stadium, home of the 2019 Super Bowl.

But nearly a century ago, 152 Nassau was where a talent scout from one of the first American record labels set up shop to put some of the sounds of the American South on disc. The result was what historians consider the first commercial country record, “The Little Old Log Cabin in the Lane,” by an Atlanta musician named Fiddlin’ John Carson.

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